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Volume 21

Contemporary European History


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Migration, Memory, and Diversity

Germany from 1945 to the Present

Edited by Cornelia Wilhelm
Preface by Konrad Jarausch

366 pages, 1 illus., bibliog., index

ISBN  978-1-78533-327-9 $120.00/£85.00 Hb Published (November 2016)

eISBN 978-1-78533-328-6 eBook


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“There is a lot to like about this book, which offers a nice mix of American and German scholars who approach their topics from a range of perspectives. It provides useful scholarly material for specialists while offering an effective introduction for students seeking to deepen their understanding of these topics.” · Adam R. Seipp, Texas A&M University

Within Germany, policies and cultural attitudes toward migrants have been profoundly shaped by the difficult legacies of the Second World War and its aftermath. This wide-ranging volume explores the complex history of migration and diversity in Germany from 1945 to today, showing how conceptions of “otherness” developed while memories of the Nazi era were still fresh, and identifying the continuities and transformations they exhibited through the Cold War and reunification. It provides invaluable context for understanding contemporary Germany’s unique role within regional politics at a time when an unprecedented influx of immigrants and refugees present the European community with a significant challenge.

Cornelia Wilhelm is currently professor of modern history at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich. From 2010 to 2016 she has been DAAD Visiting Professor in the Department of History and the Jewish Studies Program at Emory University in Atlanta and had also held visiting positions at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, and Leopold-Franzens-University of Innsbruck, Austria. She is author of Bewegung oder Verein? Nationalsozialistische Volkstumspokitik in den USA (1998); and Deutsche Juden in America: Bürgerliches Selbstbewusstsein und Jüdische Identität in den Orden B’nai B’rith und True Sisters (2007), also published in English translation (2011). She is currently working on an in-depth study on German refugee rabbis in the United States after 1933.

Subject: Postwar History Refugee & Migration Studies
Area: Germany

LC: JV8025 .M534 2017

BISAC: SOC007000 SOCIAL SCIENCE/Emigration & Immigration; HIS014000 HISTORY/Europe/Germany; HIS054000 HISTORY/Social History

BIC: HBTB Social & cultural history; JFFN Migration, immigration & emigration




Contents

Acknowledgements

Preface
Konrad H. Jarausch

Introduction
Cornelia Wilhelm

PART I: POSTWAR MIGRATIONS: HISTORY, MEMORY, AND DIVERSITY

Chapter 1. The Commemoration of Forced Migrations in Germany
Martin Schulze-Wessel

Chapter 2. A Missing Narrative: Displaced Persons in the History of Postwar 
West Germany
Anna Holian

Chapter 3. Inclusion and Exclusion of Immigrants and the Politics of Labeling: 
Thinking Beyond “Guest Workers,” “Ethnic German Resettlers,” “Refugees 
of the European Crisis,” and “Poverty Migration”
Asiye Kaya

Chapter 4. Refugee Reports: Asylum and Mass Media in Divided Germany during the 
Cold War and Beyond
Patrice G. Poutrus

PART II: INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSES TO MIGRATION AND CULTURAL DIFFERENCE

Chapter 5. History, Memory, and Symbolic Boundaries in the Federal Republic of 
Germany: Migrants and Migration in School History Textbooks
Simone Lässig

Chapter 6. Representations of Immigration and Emigration in Germany's Historic 
Museums
Katharzyna Nogueira and Dietmar Osses

Chapter 7. Archival Collections and the Study of Migration
Klaus A. Lankheit

Chapter 8. Thinking Difference in Postwar Germany: Some Epistemological Obstacles 
around “Race”
Rita Chin

PART III: RECONSIDERING HISTORY, MEMORY, AND IDENTITY IN THE POST-UNIFICATION PERIOD

Chapter 9. Nationalism and Citizenship during the Passage from the Postwar 
to the PostPostwar
Dietmar Schirmer

Chapter 10. Learning to Live with the Other Germany in the PostWall Federal Republic
Kathrin Bower

Chapter 11. Conflicting Memories, Conflicting Identities: RussianJewish Immigration 
and the Image of a New German Jewry
Karen Körber

Chapter 12. Swept Under the Rug: Homegrown AntiSemitism and Migrants as 
“Obstacles” in German Holocaust Remembrance
Annette Seidel-Arpaci

Afterword: Structures and Larger Context of Political Change in Migration and Integration Policy: Germany between Normalization and Europeanization
Holger Kolb

Index

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