IMPORTANT: Print Books Distribution Announcement
as of March 1st 2017, responsibility for print distribution for the Americas, Australasia, China, Taiwan, and Japan will be taken over by the Academic Services Division of the Ingram Content Group, Inc.
Berghahn Books Logo

berghahn New York · Oxford

View Table of Contents

Get Email Updates

Power in Practice

The Pragmatic Anthropology of Afro-Brazilian Capoeira

Sergio González Varela

179 pages, 7 illus., bibliog., index

ISBN  978-1-78533-635-5 $120.00/£85.00 Hb Not Yet Published (September 2017)

eISBN 978-1-78533-636-2 eBook Not Yet Published


Hb   Recommend to your Library Buy the ebook from these vendors

Considering the concept of power in capoeira, an Afro-Brazilian ritual art form, Varela describes ethnographically the importance that capoeira leaders (mestres) have in the social configuration of a style called Angola in Bahia, Brazil. He analyzes how individual power is essential for an understanding of the modern history of capoeira, and for the themes of embodiment, play, cosmology, and ritual action. The book also emphasizes the great significance that creativity and aesthetic expression have for capoeira’s practice and performance.

Sergio González Varela is Professor of Anthropology at Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Mexico. He is currently working on a book about the anthropologist Paul Stoller.

Subject: General Anthropology Performance Studies
Area: Latin America

BISAC: PER021000 PERFORMING ARTS/Dance/Regional & Ethnic; SOC002010 SOCIAL SCIENCE/Anthropology/Cultural; SPO027000 SPORTS & RECREATION/Martial Arts & Self-Defense

BIC: AS Dance & other performing arts; JHMC Social & cultural anthropology, ethnography




Contents

Illustrations
Tables
Acknowledgments
Preface

Introduction

Chapter 1. The Fight for Recognition: A Brief History of Capoeira Angola in Salvador,  Bahia, Brazil
Chapter 2. Capoeira Angola in Its Own Right
Chapter 3. Cosmological Bodies
Chapter 4. Mandinga: The Creation of Powerful Persons
Chapter 5. Playful Violence and the Ambiguity of Deception
Chapter 6. How Musical Instruments Become Persons

Epilogue

Glossary
References
Index

Back to Top