IMPORTANT: Print Books Distribution Announcement
as of March 1st 2017, responsibility for print distribution for the Americas, Australasia, China, Taiwan, and Japan will be taken over by the Academic Services Division of the Ingram Content Group, Inc.
Berghahn Books Logo

berghahn New York · Oxford

View Table of Contents

Get Email Updates

When Women Held the Dragon's Tongue

and Other Essays in Historical Anthropology

Hermann Rebel

330 pages, bibliog., index

ISBN  978-1-84545-620-7 $120.00/£85.00 Hb Published (February 2010)

ISBN  978-0-85745-811-7 $34.95/£24.00 Pb Published (December 2012)

eISBN 978-1-84545-798-3 eBook


Hb Pb   Request a Review or Examination Copy (in Digital Format) Recommend to your Library Buy the ebook from these vendors

This is a provocative, demanding, and sometimes annoying book that is nevertheless very much worth the effort it takes to read it…Hermann Rebel puts his finger on difficult and unresolved issues in this challenging book.  ·  JRAI

“Peasants tell tales,” one prominent cultural historian tells us (Robert Darnton). Scholars must then determine and analyze what it is they are saying and whether or not to incorporate such tellings into their histories and ethnographies. Challenging the dominant culturalist approach associated with Clifford Geertz and Marshall Sahlins among others, this book presents a critical rethinking of the philosophical anthropologies found in specific histories and ethnographies and thereby bridges the current gap between approaches to studies of peasant society and popular culture. In challenging the methodology and theoretical frameworks currently used by social scientists interested in aspects of popular culture, the author suggests a common discursive ground can be found in an historical anthropology that recognizes how myths, fairytales and histories speak to a universal need for imagining oneself in different timescapes and for linking one’s local world with a “known” larger world.

Hermann Rebel was born in Frankfurt/Main, Germany, and educated at the University of Toronto and at UC Berkeley. He has taught at York University in Toronto, the University of Iowa, and the University of Arizona and has published Peasant Classes (Princeton, 1983) as well as articles on Austrian and German agrarian and cultural history.

Series: Volume 7, Dislocations
Subject: General Anthropology General History
Area:

LC: GN345.2 .R43 2010

BL: YC.2011.a.3095

BISAC: SOC002000 SOCIAL SCIENCE/Anthropology/General; SOC002010 SOCIAL SCIENCE/Anthropology/Cultural; HIS000000 HISTORY/General

BIC: JHMC Social & cultural anthropology, ethnography; HB History




Contents

List of Tables
Preface
Acknowledgements

Chapter 1. What People without History? A Case for Historical Anthropology as a Narrative-Critical Science

PART I: MYTHS

Chapter 2. Figurations in Historical Anthropology: Two Kinds of Narrative about the Long Duration Provenances of the Holocaust
Chapter 3. Culture and Power in Eric Wolf’s Project

PART II: FAIRY TALES

Chapter 4. Why Not “Old Marie” . . . or Someone Very Much Like Her? A Reassessment of the Question about the Grimms’ Contributors
Chapter 5. When Women Held the Dragon’s Tongue

PART III: HISTORIES

Chapter 6. Peasants Against the State in the Body of Anna Maria Wagner: An Austrian Infanticide in 1832
Chapter 7. What do the Peasants Want Now? Realists and Fundamentalists in Swiss and South German Rural Politics, 1650-1750

PART IV: ANTHROPOLOGIES

Chapter 8. Reactionary Modernism and the Postmodern Challenge to Narrative Ethics

Bibliography
Index

Back to Top