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Crossing Boundaries

The Exclusion and Inclusion of Minorities in Germany and America

Edited by Larry Eugene Jones

272 pages, bibliog., index

ISBN  978-1-57181-285-8 $120.00/£85.00 Hb Published (October 2001)

ISBN  978-1-57181-306-0 $34.95/£24.00 Pb Published (October 2001)

eISBN 978-1-78533-062-9 eBook


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Description

"Crossing Boundaries" – these two words serve not only as the leitmotiv around which the following collection of essays has been organized but also as a metaphor for the life and career of the person who inspired their composition: Georg G. Iggers, whose entire life has been one of crossing boundaries: geographical, racial, and professional. Just as Iggers has done his best as a historian to break down professional and disciplinary boundaries, this volume examines, from different angles, the ways in which Germany and the United States have dealt with the inclusion and exclusion of minorities.

Comparing the respective fates of the Jews in Germany and the African-Americans in the United States, this collection offers new insight as to how and why the struggle for equality played out so differently in the two countries and in what ways the issues of migration, multi-ethnicity, discrimination, and integration have informed the historical discourse in the postmodern era.

Larry Jones is Professor of History at Canisius College.

Subject: General History Refugee & Migration Studies
Area: Germany North America



Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction: "Crossing Boundaries" as Leitmotiv and Metaphor
Larry Eugene Jones

Keynote Address: The Expulsion of Jewish Professors and Students from the University of Berlin during the Third Reich
Konrad H. Jarausch

PART I: MIGRATION, ETHNICITY, AND MINORITIES IN PUBLIC POLICY IN GERMANY AND THE UNITED STATES

Chapter 1. Immigration, Naturalization, and Ethno-national Traditions in Germany: From the Citizenship Law of 1913 to the Law of 1999
Klaus J. Bade

Chapter 2. Migration and Public Policy in Germany, 1918–1939
Jochen Oltmer

Chapter 3. Racism as Public Policy in America's Cities in the Twentieth Century
Ronald H. Bayor

PART II: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON THE EXPERIENCES OF JEWISH REFUGEES FROM GERMANY

Chapter 4. Growing Up Jewish in the Nazi Era: School, Emigration, and War
Werner T. Angress

Chapter 5. William Stern (1871–1938): A World-View at Risk
Supriya Mukherjee

Chapter 6. Exclusions and Inclusions of a Cosmopolitan Philosopher: The Case of Ernst Cassirer
Michael Hänel

PART III: THE STRUGGLE FOR EQUAL RIGHTS IN GERMANY AND THE UNITED STATES

Chapter 7. Selecting the "Better Elements": Jewish Students and the Admission of Women to German Universities, 1890–1914
Patricia Mazón

Chapter 8. The Central Association of German Citizens of the Jewish Faith: Jews and the Struggle for Civil Rights in Imperial Germany
Trude Maurer

Chapter 9. Objectivity and Involvement: Georg G. Iggers and Writing the History of the Little Rock School Crisis
Tony A. Freyer

Chapter 10. Activists, Leaders, and Supporters: On the Role of Whites in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
Manfred Berg

PART IV: HISTORIOGRAPHICAL REFLECTIONS ON DIFFERENCE AND EQUALITY

Chapter 11. Crossing Borders in American Civil Rights Historiography
Tony A. Freyer

Chapter 12. Objectivity and Involvement: Writing the History of German Historiography
Georg G. Iggers

Chapter 13. Reshaping the World: Historiography from a Universal Perspective
Eckhardt Fuchs

Notes on Contributors
Bibliography
Index

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