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Volume 4

Migration & Refugees


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Immigration Controls

The Search for Workable Policies in Germany and the United States

Edited by Kay Hailbronner, David A. Martin and Hiroshi Motomura

240 pages, bibliog., index

ISBN  978-1-57181-089-2 $120.00/£85.00 Hb Published (March 1998)

ISBN  978-1-57181-090-8 $29.95/£21.00 Pb Published (July 1998)


Hb Pb   Recommend to your Library

"Offers a good and detailed overview of U.S and German legal provisions."  · International Migration Review

Some of the most pressing questions in immigration law and policy today concern the problem of immigration controls. How are immigration laws administered, and how are they enforced against those who enter and remain in a receiving country without legal permission? Comparing the United States and Germany, two of the four extended essays in this volume concern enforcement; the other two address techniques for managing high-volume asylum systems in both countries.

Kay Hailbronner is professor of international law, European law, and constitutional law at the University of Konstanz and director of the Research Center of European and International Law of Immigration and Asylum at that institution. He is the author of numerous books and articles on immigration and asylum matters, among them Current Asylum in Germany (University of California, Berkeley, 1995).

David A. Martin is Henry L. & Grace Doherty Professor of Law at the University of Virginia. From 1978 to 1980 he served in the Human Rights Bureau of the U.S. Department of State, and in August 1995 he took leave from the university to become general counsel of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). Work on his chapter in this volume was virtually complete before he assumed that office, and he was not involved in the final shaping of the project’s policy recommendations or the conclusions printed in this volume. In any case, the opinions expressed therein do not necessarily represent the views of the INS, the Department of Justice, or the U.S. government.

Hiroshi Motomura has been a professor of law at the University of Colorado School of Law in Boulder since 1982. Before that, he was an attorney in Washington, D.C., with a practice that included immigration law matters. He writes and lectures extensively on immigration law and policy topics, with an emphasis on constitutional issues. Publications include the law school casebook Immigration: Policy and Process (with T. Alexander Aleinikoff and David A. Martin; 3d ed. 1995) and the articles “The Curious Evolution of Immigration Law: Procedural Surrogates for Substantive Constitutional Rights” (Columbia Law Review 1992) and “Immigration Law after a Century of Plenary Power: Phantom Constitutional Norms and Statutory Interpretation” (The Yale Law Journal 1990).

Subject: Refugee & Migration Studies
Area: Germany North America

LC: JV6483 .M54 1997

BL: YC.1998.a.1845

BISAC: LAW032000 LAW/Emigration & Immigration; SOC007000 SOCIAL SCIENCE/Emigration & Immigration

BIC: JFFN Migration, immigration & emigration; LNDA1 Immigration law




Contents

Introduction
Kay Hailbronner and Hiroshi Motomura

Chapter 1. The Obstacles to Effective Internal Enforcement of the Immigration Laws in the United States
David A. Martin

Chapter 2. Internal Controls and Actual Removals of Deportable Aliens: the Current Legal Situation in the Federal Republic of Germany
Hans-Joachim Cremer

Chapter 3. The New Techniques for Managing High-Volume Asylum Systems
Stephen Legomsky

Chapter 4. New Techniques for Rendering Asylum Manageable
Kay Hailbronner

Conclusion: Immigration Admissions and Immigration Controls
Kay Hailbronner, David A. Martin and Hiroshi Motomura

Notes on Contributors
Bibliography
Index

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