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Volume 21

Making Sense of History


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Marking Evil

Holocaust Memory in the Global Age

Edited by Amos Goldberg and Haim Hazan

384 pages, 17 illus., bibliog., index

ISBN  978-1-78238-619-3 $120.00/£85.00 Hb Published (May 2015)

eISBN 978-1-78238-620-9 eBook


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“Goldberg and Hazan must be congratulated on bringing together an important and exciting collection of essays that in their sheer interdisciplinary range are essential reading for scholars across the arts and humanities.” · Holocaust Studies

“This is a superb, original, brave and powerful book… the readings of texts are fresh and provocative, and the book benefits from its wide range of approaches to the question of global memory… I was sent off in many different directions all at once after reading this—who can ask for more from a book, especially one on an ostensibly overcrowded field such as Holocaust Studies?” · Dan Stone, University of London

Talking about the Holocaust has provided an international language for ethics, victimization, political claims, and constructions of collective identity. As part of a worldwide vocabulary, that language helps set the tenor of the era of globalization. This volume addresses manifestations of Holocaust-engendered global discourse by critically examining their function and inherent dilemmas, and the ways in which Holocaust-related matters still instigate public debate and academic deliberation. It contends that the contradiction between the totalizing logic of globalization and the assumed uniqueness of the Holocaust generates continued intellectual and practical discontent.

Amos Goldberg is a Senior Lecturer in Holocaust Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and is a Fellow at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute. He is the author of Trauma in First Person: Diary Writing During the Holocaust and the co-editor with Bashir Bashir of Traumatic Past and Civil Spheres: The Holocaust and the Nakba in Israel/Palestine.

Haim Hazan is Professor of Sociology and Social Anthropology at Tel-Aviv University, where he is also co-director of the Minerva Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of the End of Life. He is the author of several books, including The Limbo People; Old Age: Constructions and Deconstructions; Managing Change in Old Age; A Paradoxical Community; From First Principles; Simulated Dreams: Israeli Youth and Virtual Zionism, and Serendipity in Anthropological Research: The Nomadic Turn (edited with Esther Herzog).

Subject: Postwar History Genocide Studies
Area:



Contents

Preface
Amos Goldberg and Haim Hazan

SECTION I: INTRODUCTIONS

Chapter 1. Ethics, Identity and Anti-Fundamental Fundamentalism: Holocaust Memory in the Global Age (a cultural-political introduction)
Amos Goldberg

Chapter 2. Globalized Holocaust: An Anthropological Oxymoron (an anthropological- theoretical introduction)
Haim Hazan

SECTION II: HOW GLOBAL IS HOLOCAUST MEMORY?

Chapter 3. The Holocaust isn’t--and isn’t Likely to Become--a Global Memory
Peter Novick

Chapter 4. The Holocaust as a Symbolic Manual: The French Revolution, the Holocaust, and Global Memories
Alon Confino

Chapter 5. “After Auschwitz”:A Constitutive Turning Point in Moral Philosophy
Ronit Peleg

Chapter 6. Cosmopolitan Body: the Holocaust as Route to the Globally Human
Nigel Rapport

SECTION III: MEMORY, TRAUMA AND TESTIMONY: THE HOLOCAUST AND NON-WESTERN MEMORIES

Chapter 7. Holocaust Memories and Cosmopolitan Practices: Humanitarian Witnessing between Emergencies and the Catastrophe
Michal Givoni

Chapter 8. The Global Semiotics of Trauma and Testimony: A Comparative Study of Jewish-Israeli, Canadian-Cambodian and Cambodian Genocidal Descendant Legacies
Carol Kidron

Chapter 9. Genres of Identification:  Holocaust Testimony and Postcolonial Witness
Louise Bethlehem

Chapter 10. Commemorating the Twentieth Century: The Holocaust and Nonviolent Struggle in Global Discourse
Tamar Katriel

Chapter 11. Rethinking the Politics of the Past: Multidirectional Memory in the Archives of Implication
Michael Rothberg

SECTION IV: THE POETICS OF THE GLOBAL EVENT: A CRITICAL VIEW

Chapter 12. Pain & Pleasure in Poetic Representations of the Holocaust
Rina Dudai

Chapter 13. Auschwitz: George Tabori’s Short Joke
Shulamith Lev-Aladgem

Chapter 14. The Law of Dispersion: a Reading of W.G. Sebald’s Prose
Jacob Hessing

Chapter 15. Holocaust Envy: Globalization of the Holocaust in Israeli Discourse
Batya Shimony

SECTION V: CLOSURE

Chapter 16. The Kristallnacht as Symbolic Turning Point in Nazi Rule
Emanuel Marx

Chapter 17. A Personal Postscript
Sidra DeKoven Ezrahi

List of Contributors
Index

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