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Migration Control in the North-atlantic World

The Evolution of State Practices in Europe and the United States from the French Revolution to the Inter-War Period

Edited by Andreas Fahrmeir, Olivier Faron and Patrick Weil

336 pages, bibliog., index

ISBN  978-1-57181-812-6 $120.00/£85.00 Hb Published (January 2003)

ISBN  978-1-57181-328-2 $34.95/£24.00 Pb Published (April 2005)


Hb Pb   Recommend to your Library

“…we still know surprisingly little about the enforcement of [national migration control laws] and their effects on migration…This book significantly reduces our ignorance…astonishingly, most of the papers…manage to thread a path through the formidable tangle of law, jurisdictions and complexities while maintaining a clear narrative voice and not losing sight of the larger issues.”  · Comparativ

In general, this set of essays, in its breadth of contributions and range of topics, is a major value to specialists and advanced students. The essays are argued tightly, et rest on a substantial base of evidence.  · History: Reviews of New Books

"[A] pioneering study ... As well as its empirical strengths, the book also demonstrates Fahrmeir's comfort in dealing with theory ... The rigor with which [he] tackles his subject deserves comment ... A genuine comparative history ... an extremely important monograph ... a major contribution to out understanding of the legal position of aliens in modern European history."  ·  American Historical Review

The migration movements of the 20th century have led to an increased interest in similarly dramatic population changes in the preceding century. The contributors to this volume - legal scholars, sociologists, political scientist and historians - focus on migration control in the 19th century, concentrating on three areas in particular: the impact of the French Revolution on the development of modern citizenship laws and on the development of new forms of migration control in France and elsewhere; the theory and practice of migration control in various European states is examined, focusing on the control of paupers, emigrants and "ordinary" travelers as well as on the interrelationship between the different administrative levels - local, regional and national - at which migration control was exercised. Finally, on the development of migration control in two countries of immigration: the United States and France. Taken altogether, these essays demonstrate conclusively that the image of the 19th century as a liberal era during which migration was unaffected by state intervention is untenable and in serious need of revision.

Andreas Fahrmeir is currently in the History Department at the University of Cologne.

Olivier Faron is a researcher at the CNRS, Université Paris and lecturer at the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris. He is secretary general of the Société de Démographie Historique and deputy secretary general of the Société Française d'Histoire Urbaine.

Patrick Weil is Director of Research at CNRS in the Centre for Research on the History of Social Movements and Trade Unionism, Paris I - Sorbonne. He is the author of a report for the French Prime Minister on French nationality and immigration law in 1997 and is a member of the French Consultative Commission on Human Rights.

Subject: Refugee & Migration Studies Archaeology
Area: North America

LC: JV7590 .M5243 2003

BL: YC.2003.a.13981

BISAC: SOC007000 SOCIAL SCIENCE/Emigration & Immigration; LAW032000 LAW/Emigration & Immigration

BIC: JFFN Migration, immigration & emigration; LAQ Law & society




Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Notes on Contributors

Introduction
Andreas Fahrmeir, Olivier Faron and Patrick Weil

PART I: BEYOND THE FRENCH REVOLUTION: NEW CONCEPTS OF CITIZENSHIP: NEW METHODS OF CONTROL

Chapter 1. The Eighteenth-Century Citizenship Revolution in France
Peter Sahlins

Chapter 2. ‘African Citizens’: Slavery, Freedom and Migration During the French Revolution
Laurent Dubois

Chapter 3. Paris and its Foreigners in the Late Eighteenth Century
Olivier Faron and Cyril Grange

Chapter 4. British Nationality Policy as a Counter-Revolutionary Strategy During the Napoleonic Wars: The Emergence of Modern Naturalization Regulations
Margrit Schulte Beerbühl

PART II: AN AGE OF EXPERIMENTATION: CONTROLLING MOVEMENT IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

Chapter 5. Passports and the Development of Immigration Controls in the North Atlantic World During the Long Nineteenth Century
John Torpey

Chapter 6. ‘Beggars appear everywhere!’: Changing Approaches to Migration Control in Mid- Nineteenth Century Munich
K. M. N. Carpenter

Chapter 7. Qualitative Migration Controls in the Antebellum United States
Gerald L. Neuman

Chapter 8. The Transformation of Nineteenth-Century West European Expulsion Policy, 1880-1914
Frank Caestecker

Chapter 9. Foreigners and the Law in Nineteenth-Century Austria: Juridical Concepts and Legal Rights in the Light of the Development of Citizenship
Birgitta Bader-Zaar

Chapter 10. Empowerment and Control: Conflicting Central and Regional Interests in Migration Within the Habsburg Monarchy
Andrea Komlosy

Chapter 11. Was the Nineteenth Century a Golden Age for Immigrants? The Changing Articulation of National, Local and Voluntary Controls
David Feldman

Chapter 12. Revolutionaries into Beggars: Alien Policies in the Netherlands 1814-1914
Leo Lucassen

PART III: NEW DETERMINANTS OF MIGRATION CONTROL: COMMERCIAL INTERESTS, UNIONS AND POLITICIANS

Chapter 13. The Archaeology of ‘Remote Control’
Aristide R. Zolberg

Chapter 14. Hamburg and the Transit of East European Emigrants
Katja Wüstenbecker

Chapter 15. Labour Unions and the Nationalisation of Immigration Restriction in the United States, 1880-1924
Catherine Collomp

Chapter 16. Between Altruism and Self-Interest: Immigration Restriction and the Emergence of American-Jewish
Politics in the United States
Michael Berkowitz

Chapter 17. Races at the Gate. Racial Distinctions in Immigration Policy: A Comparison between France and the
United States
Patrick Weil

PART IV: PROVISIONAL CONCLUSIONS

Chapter 18. Law and Practice: Problems in Researching the History of Migration Controls
Andreas Fahrmeir

Index

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