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Volume 5

Monographs in German History


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Citizens and Aliens

Foreigners and the Law in Britain and German States 1789-1870

Andreas Fahrmeir

304 pages, 13 tables, 3 figs, bibliog., index

ISBN  978-1-57181-717-4 $120.00/£85.00 Hb Published (August 2000)


Hb   Recommend to your Library

“Fahrmeir’s lucid and valuable study thus establishes not only that German conceptions and systems of citizenship predate the victory of German nationalist (and nativist) thought, but also that, despite the greater liberality of the British system in most respects, the German regime had many attributes more liberal than the British…Fahrmeir strikes a telling and persuasive blow for the “modernit” account of nationalism against the “primordialists.”."  ·  Central European History

"... [a] truly comparative ... lucid and valuable study ... By virtue of his scrupulous and searching exploration of the 'in-between' era in which citizenship regimes emerged, Fahrmeir strikes a telling and persuasive blow to the 'modernist' account of nationalism against the 'primordialist'."  ·  Central European History

"His pathbreaking book reflects a significant amount of original scholarly research, and clarifies a large number of previously poorly illuminated questions and relationships."  · H-German

"[A] pioneering study ... As well as its empirical strengths, the book also demonstrates Fahrmeir's comfort in dealing with theory ... The rigor with which [he] tackles his subject deserves comment ... A genuine comparative history ... an extremely important monograph ... a major contribution to out understanding of the legal position of aliens in modern European history."  · American Historical Review

"... concisely written ... excellently researched."  · Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

"Future students of issues [such as citizenship, naturalization, extradition etc] have in Fahrmeir's book a model of the even-handed approach required."   · The International History Review

"Fahrmeir's carefully argued and detailed study ... should be read by anybody who is interested in the current debate on nationality and migration."  · H-NET Liste fuer Sozial- und Kulturgeschichte

From the last decade of the 18th century, European states began to define nationality more rigorously. Regulations covering matters as diverse as passports, residence permits, taxes, and admission to university examinations made clear that nationality mattered more than rank. Drawing on the files of central and regional administrations and on individual case studies and travel accounts, the author offers a detailed examination of the practical consequences of alien status in liberal England and in the comparatively restrictive German states. In the latter all citizens of other German states were considered foreigners, whereas in the United Kingdom Irish immigrants were by law British subjects along with all other persons born on British soil. These differences in legal definition of citizenship should have far-reaching consequences for the development of modern nation states, consequences the effects of which can be felt to this day.

Andreas Fahrmeir received the Seeley Medal and the Tirlwall Prize 1999 for this study. He is currently a Senior Research Fellow at the German Historical Institute, London.

Subject: 18th/19th Century History Refugee & Migration Studies
Area: Germany Europe

LC: JV8033 .F35 2000

BL: YC.2001.a.8801

BISAC: HIS037060 HISTORY/Modern/19th Century; HIS014000 HISTORY/Europe/Germany; SOC007000 SOCIAL SCIENCE/Emigration & Immigration

BIC: HBJD European history; JFFN Migration, immigration & emigration




Contents

List of Tables and Figures
Preface
Abbreviations

Introduction

Chapter 1. Definitions of Citizenship
Chapter 2. Naturalisation
Chapter 3. Passports and the Control of Foreign Travellers
Chapter 4. Residence Abroad
Chapter 5. An Attempt at Explanation

Conclusion

Select Bibliography
Index

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