Berghahn Books Logo

berghahn New York · Oxford

Author Archives

Remembering Forgetting: A Monument to Erasure at the University of North Carolina

by Timothy J. McMillan The following essay originally appeared in Silence, Screen and Spectacle: Rethinking Social Memory in the Age of Information. This book is now available in paperback. In 2001, I began teaching a first-year seminar titled “Defining Blackness.” My journey with that class and its descendants is intertwined with my relationship with the memorial landscape, concrete […]

Berghahn Journals: New Issues Published in July

          

International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

Pronounced by the General Assembly of the United Nations in December 1994, The International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples is observed on August 9 each year to promote and protect the rights of the world’s indigenous population. Making up 5% of the world’s population there are an estimated 370 million indigenous people living across […]

Portrait of a Storyteller

The following is a post by Stephen Most, author of Stories Make the World: Reflections on Storytelling and the Art of the Documentary. Two portraits of the young man I once was, one oil-painted, the other shaped in clay, watch over my study. More than half a century after they were made I portrayed the painter, Pedro […]

Why do so many American Parents Struggle with Nighttime Breastfeeding and Sleep?

by Cecília Tomori For World Breastfeeding Week, we’re delighted to offer FREE access to a chapter from Nighttime Breastfeeding for a limited time. Click here to access this chapter, titled Embodied Cultural Dilemmas: An Anthropological Approach to the Study of Nighttime Breastfeeding and Sleep. Nighttime Breastfeeding addresses the central question: why do so many American parents struggle […]

Introducing Contention: The Multidisciplinary Journal of Social Protest

In 2011 a global wave of protest changed the way in which people saw contention. January saw two revolutions: first, in Tunisia culminating in the overthrow of then president Ben Ali; and second in Egypt with protests that would end the Mubarak regime within eighteen days. This wave of protest spread to Libya, Syria, Yemen […]

Promoting ‘self-reliance’ for refugees: what does it really mean?

The following is a post by Naohiko Omata, author of The Myth of Self-Reliance: Economic Lives Inside a Liberian Refugee Camp. Promotion of ‘self-reliance’ for refugees has occupied a central seat in the policy arena of the international refugee regime in recent years. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) broadly defines self-reliance as ‘the social […]

SIMULATED SHELVES: BROWSE JULY 2017 NEW BOOKS

We’re delighted to offer a selection of latest releases from our core subjects of Anthropology, Applied Anthropology, Film Studies, Gender Studies, History, and Media Studies, along with our New in Paperback titles.   EMPTINESS AND FULLNESS Ethnographies of Lack and Desire in Contemporary China Edited by Susanne Bregnbæk and Mikkel Bunkenborg Volume 2, Studies in Social Analysis

Recreating universities to help revive democracy

The following is a post by Davydd J. Greenwood, Goldwin Smith Professor of Anthropology Emeritus, Cornell University The following are some management verities that abound in current university administrations: Good universities require highly-paid leaders hired by Boards of Trustees through executive search services. Good universities have large administrative staffs, often outnumbering the faculty. Good university […]

Book Launch for Stories Make the World

The following is a post about the book launch for Stories Make the World: Reflections on Storytelling and the Art of the Documentary by Stephen Most. It’s odd to see the result of years of work contained within a small object, whether it is a book, a DVD, or a phone on which films are streaming. Stories Make the […]