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Latest Blog Articles

International Day of Action for Women’s Health

May 28 is the International Day of Action for Women’s Health. For over 30 years, women’s rights advocates and allies in the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) movement worldwide have commemorated this day in diverse ways. Visit the campaign’s website for more information and ways to participate. At a time when women’s human […]

Meet the Author: Gaëlle Fisher

Dr. Gaëlle Fisher’s recent monograph, Resettlers and Survivors: Bukovina and the Politics of Belonging in West Germany and Israel, 1945–1989, explores some of the more complex reverberations of World War II. It is the third volume in Berghahn’s growing Worlds of Memory series, published in collaboration with the Memory Studies Association. Located on the border […]

A place for sexually variant and gender non-conforming America

On May 17th 1990, the World Health Organization decided to declassify homosexuality as a mental disorder. 14 years later, the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia was established to expose the relentless violence and discrimination experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexuals, transgender, intersex people and all other people with diverse sexual orientations, gender identities or […]

An Interview with Courtney Work

Courtney Work is Assistant Professor in the Department of Ethnology, National Chengchi University (Taiwan). She studied at Cornell University, and has published multiple papers on the intersections of religion, traditional practices, and the politics of land, global development, and climate change. She is the author of the forthcoming title Tides of Empire: Religion, Development, and Environment […]

Marcel Mauss, a gift to the social sciences

Marcel Mauss (May 10, 1872—Feb. 10, 1950), celebrated author of The Gift and nephew of Émile Durkheim, was a French sociologist and anthropologist whose contributions include a highly original comparative study of the relation between forms of exchange and social structure. His views on the theory and method of ethnology are thought to have influenced […]

In commemoration of the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe

Today marks the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, commemorating the conclusion of World War II. On May 8, 1945, the Allies formally accepted Nazi Germany’s unconditional surrender, marking the end of the war on the European continent. In the spirit of this day, browse our new and featured titles on the history of […]

Freed from Fear and Sadness: The New Germany

Michael Meng and Adam R. Seipp The writing of German history since 1945 has often, if not excessively, been shaped by critical and negative attitudes; or, as Baruch Spinoza would put it, by excessive fear and sadness in the face of human suffering. Ruination, mourning, absence, destruction, and failure are the leitmotifs of postwar German historiography. Amid […]

Excerpt: Time and Midwifery Practice

The International Day of the Midwife (May 5) has been celebrated every year since 1992, recognizing the vital role midwives play in reproductive care. This year’s theme Celebrate. Demonstrate. Mobilize. Unite focuses on how midwives and women can partner together toward a shared goal of gender equality. To learn more and get involved, visit the International […]

An Interview with Julie Patricia Johnson

Julie Patricia Johnson is an associate researcher at the University of Melbourne. She is the author of The Candle and the Guillotine: Revolution and Justice in Lyon, 1789–93, published by Berghahn Books. She has presented her research at international conferences and has published work in journals such as French History and Lilith: A Feminist History Journal. What drew you […]

Blog: EnviroSociety

New Featured Article!: Carbon Value between Equivalence and Differentiation

The latest Environment and Society featured article is now available! This month's article—”Carbon Value between Equivalence and Differentiation”—comes from Volume 5 (2014). In his article, Steffen Dalsgaard reviews the different understandings of value implicated in ... Continue reading →

Blog: FocaalBlog

Don Kalb: Covid, Crisis, and the Coming Contestations

Don Kalb, University of Bergen At some point in late January I told my family over WhatsApp with the Marxist bluster they usually enjoy from me that if Covid was to come to the West it would be the end of capitalism. Wuhan was already in lockdown and a red alert was sounding for many other ... Continue reading →

Blog: Museum Companion

Brazil’s 200-year-old Museu Nacional destroyed by fire

One of the largest natural history museums in the Americas was engulfed in flame on Sunday, 2 September 2018. A majority of Rio de Janeiro’s 200-year-old Museu Nacional's archive is believed to have been destroyed. The museum's collections included items brought to Brazil by Dom Pedro I, ... Continue reading →

Blog: AJEC Blog

Call for Papers – Forum Edition Spring 2021

We are inviting expressions of interest for a forthcoming forum edition of the Anthropological Journal of European Cultures to be published in early 2021. The theme of this edition is ‘Cultural Heritage Across European Borders: Bridges or Walls?’ and will be edited by Philip McDermott and Sara ... Continue reading →

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