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Series Spotlight: Shakespeare &

Image result for william shakespeareWidely regarded as one of the greatest writers in the English language and the world’s greatest dramatist, William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright and actor. Shakespeare’s plays being translated in over 50 languages and performed across the globe for audiences of all ages. Shakespeare was also an actor and the creator of the Globe Theatre, a historical theatre, and company that is visited by hundreds of thousands of tourists every year.

In honor of Shakespeare’s birthday, we are delighted to showcase our growing book series, SHAKESPEARE &, exploring Shakespeare and his work outside the lens of traditional literary studies. By intersecting the worlds beyond fiction and poetry with those disciplines outside of literature and drama, this series offers nuanced approaches that reveal a more diverse and complex legacy left by Shakespeare.

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Commemorating the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

Read an excerpt from Marek Haltof’s POLISH FILM AND THE HOLOCAUST: Politics and Memory.

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Book Preview: Making Scenes: Global Perspectives on Scenes in Rock Art

Did scenes in rock art create new ways of seeing the world? In the spirit of the SAA annual conference we are delighted to provide a book preview (along with striking images) of Iain Davidson and April Nowell’s title, MAKING SCENES: Global Perspectives on Scenes in Rock Art.

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Born on April 15: Durkheim, the ‘founding father’ of sociology

“Social man…is the masterpiece of existence.”
― Émile Durkheim (April 15, 1858 – November 15, 1917)

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International Roma Day

International Roma Day (8 April) recognizes the history and celebrates the cultures, traditions, and contributions of Gypsy, Roma, and Traveler communities.

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Excerpt: Autism and Affordances of Achievement

Excerpted from Olga Solomon’s “Autism and Affordances of Achievement: Narrative Genres and Parenting Practices,” in The Social Life of Achievement

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF ACHIEVEMENT
Edited by Nicholas J. Long and Henrietta Moore
Vol. 2, Wyse Series in Social Anthropology
What happens when people “achieve”? Why do reactions to “achievement” vary so profoundly? And how might an anthropological study of achievement and its consequences allow us to develop a more nuanced model of the motivated agency that operates in the social world? These questions lie at the heart of this volume. Drawing on research from Southeast Asia, Europe, the United States, and Latin America, this collection develops an innovative framework for explaining achievement’s multiple effects—one which brings together cutting-edge theoretical insights into politics, psychology, ethics, materiality, aurality, embodiment, affect and narrative. In doing so, the volume advances a new agenda for the study of achievement within anthropology, emphasizing the significance of achievement as a moment of cultural invention, and the complexity of “the achiever” as a subject position.

Available in eBook and paperback

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Fascism and Conservation

Excerpted from Sandra Cheney’s Nature of the Miracle Years: Conservation in West Germany, 1945-1975

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Most Popular #BerghahnOpenAnthro Articles of 2020

Berghahn Open Anthro is a subscribe-to-open model being piloted by Berghahn Books in partnership with Libraria, a group of researchers who are also supporting a number of other publishers hoping to adopt this model should the pilot prove successful. This model was developed in part through a 2019 ground-breaking collaborative meeting between publishers, libraries, funders, and OA experts.

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Fascism and Film


Excerpted from Carl Plantinga’s “Fascist Affect in 300,” in Projections 13(2), 20-37.

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Ceri Houlbrook: Love in the Time of Covid

Love-locking, the attachment of a padlock to a public structure, is the forte of the traveler. Although not exclusively a tourist custom, it is a popular practice for people visiting a new place and wanting to leave their mark on it. The love-lock has become the inverted souvenir: left behind rather than taken away, but still a token of experience. And social media brims with photographs and videos of tourists locking their love on bridges and monuments – photos and videos that become the modern-day postcard, conveyed to family and friends back home.

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