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Category Archives: In Their Own Words

Leyla and Eman

Connecting German-Turkish and Syrian-Turkish Stories By SUSAN BETH ROTTMANN, Özyeğin University

A Series on a Series: Part I

Interview with Series Editor Sam Beck, Romani Studies Did you know Berghahn Books has over one hundred series? Covering a wide range of subjects and areas, Berghahn’s series list continues to grow as new interventions and trends in scholarship are made.

Muted Memories

Heritage-Making, Bagamoyo, and the East African Caravan Trade BY JAN LINDSTRÖM

Who is María Lionza?

By Roger Canals, lecturer in the department of social anthropology at the University of Barcelona. The book A Goddess in Motion: Visual Creativity in the Cult of María Lionza finds its origins in my vivid interest in Afro-Latin American religions, art and visual anthropology. I understand the latter in a broad sense, that is, as […]

Winter and Summer Pockets of Hope

by Christine Cohen Park

“Pockets of Hope”: Peaceful Coexistence in Israel & Palestine

by Christine Cohen Park

Why Remember Margaret Mead?

  (Originally Published 12/14/2015)   To commemorate Margaret Mead’s birthday this month, we’re honored to share a short piece from her daughter, Mary Catherine Bateson. Bateson is an anthropologist and the author of many books, including Composing a Life. As she notes below, 2015 marks the 91st anniversary of Mead’s trip to Samoa in 1925, when […]

An Interview with Nafisa Shah, Author of Honour and Violence

The following is an interview with Nafisa Shah about hew new book Honour and Violence: Gender, Power and Law in Southern Pakistan. 1) When did you begin working on Honour and Violence? Can you briefly tell us about your journey as a journalist, scholar, and politician following honor killings in Pakistan? Honour and Violence is […]

Remembering Forgetting: A Monument to Erasure at the University of North Carolina

by Timothy J. McMillan The following essay originally appeared in Silence, Screen and Spectacle: Rethinking Social Memory in the Age of Information. This book is now available in paperback. In 2001, I began teaching a first-year seminar titled “Defining Blackness.” My journey with that class and its descendants is intertwined with my relationship with the memorial landscape, concrete […]

Promoting ‘self-reliance’ for refugees: what does it really mean?

The following is a post by Naohiko Omata, author of The Myth of Self-Reliance: Economic Lives Inside a Liberian Refugee Camp. Promotion of ‘self-reliance’ for refugees has occupied a central seat in the policy arena of the international refugee regime in recent years. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) broadly defines self-reliance as ‘the social […]