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Author Archives

TRANSBORDER MEDIA SPACES: AYUUJK VIDEOMAKING BETWEEN MEXICO AND THE US

Ingrid Kummels As a response to the Covid-19 pandemic, social arrangements allowing people to carry on despite the restrictions on mobility forced upon them became predominant across the world. From work (home office) and education (home schooling) to birthday parties, meetings, conferences and political campaigns (Zoom, etc.) diverse aspects of life were reoriented to adapt […]

On Archival Access in a Pandemic

Catherine A. Nichols Exchanging Objects and my broader research agenda considers how and why certain objects left museums, institutions so often associated with preservation, archiving, and keeping. It can be an odd thing, to go to a museum to intentionally study things that aren’t there. When the idea for this research was suggested to me […]

The 75th anniversary of the founding of the East German film studio DEFA

Elizabeth Ward On 17 May 1946, the Deutsche Film-Aktiengesellschaft (DEFA) was officially founded. Over the course of the following four decades, the studio produced nearly 700 feature films, as well as hundred of animation and documentary films. By the time it was finally privatised and sold following German reunification, DEFA was one of Europe’s largest […]

Karl Marx as a Young Journalist

By Rolf Hosfeld Excerpted by Karl Marx: An Intellectual Biography by Rolf Hosfeld, Translated from the German by Bernard Heise Karl Marx was born May 5, 1818. As a young man he was a journalist and an editor for Rheinische Zeitung, a liberal-socialist newspaper published in Germany. The paper was previously edited by Adolf Friedrich […]

Excerpt: Autism and Affordances of Achievement

Excerpted from Olga Solomon’s “Autism and Affordances of Achievement: Narrative Genres and Parenting Practices,” in The Social Life of Achievement THE SOCIAL LIFE OF ACHIEVEMENTEdited by Nicholas J. Long and Henrietta MooreVol. 2, Wyse Series in Social Anthropology What happens when people “achieve”? Why do reactions to “achievement” vary so profoundly? And how might an […]

Ceri Houlbrook: Love in the Time of Covid

Love-locking, the attachment of a padlock to a public structure, is the forte of the traveler. Although not exclusively a tourist custom, it is a popular practice for people visiting a new place and wanting to leave their mark on it. The love-lock has become the inverted souvenir: left behind rather than taken away, but […]

Birds of Passage: Hunting and conservation in Malta

Mark-Anthony Falzon My interest in, and love for, nature go back to my early childhood. There was something Victorian about the books I read on butterflies: they contained descriptions and beautiful illustrations of (British, usually) species, but they also taught you how to catch butterflies, kill them using potassium cyanide, and set them on mounting […]

A Taste for Oppression

An interview with Ronan Hervouet following the 2020 Belarus Election 13 August 2020

Do Petitions matter? Rethinking Jewish Petitioning during the Holocaust

Thomas Pegelow Kaplan and Wolf Gruner Raul Hilberg’s path-breaking 1961 study The Destruction of the European Jews rightfully remains on the reading list of any serious student of the Holocaust. Nonetheless, Hilberg’s insistence on European Jews‘ alleged “almost complete lack of resistance” has been subjected to frequent scholarly criticism. He partially based this claim on […]

Voices on War and Genocide

Omer Bartov, Brown University This book is derived from research I carried out for my recent monograph, Anatomy of a Genocide: The Life and Death of a Town Called Buczacz (2018). In the course of looking for documents in scores of archives and libraries, as well as  seeking personal accounts that would help me reconstruct the “biography” of a […]