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Monetising the Dividual Self: The Emergence of the Lifestyle Blog and Influencers in Malaysia

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Series
Volume 8

Anthropology of Media



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Monetising the Dividual Self

The Emergence of the Lifestyle Blog and Influencers in Malaysia

Julian Hopkins

220 pages, 26 illus., bibliog., index

ISBN  978-1-78920-118-5 $120.00/£85.00 Hb Not Yet Published (January 2019)

eISBN 978-1-78920-119-2 eBook Not Yet Published


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Reviews

“A valuable contribution to the field of New Media Studies… It provides rich and first-hand ethnographic insights into a transitory phase of the blog genre – from a point in time where we can see how other social media platforms and genres (e.g. Facebook, YouTube, Instagram) have built upon and further transformed practices of lifestyle blogging.” • Jan-Hinrik Schmidt, Hans-Bredow-Institute for Media Research, Hamburg

Description

Combining theoretical and empirical discussions with shorter “thick description” case studies, this book offers an anthropological exploration of the emergence in Malaysia of lifestyle bloggers – precursors to current social media “microcelebrities” and “influencers.” It tracks the transformation of personal blogs, which attracted readers with spontaneous and authentic accounts of everyday life, into lifestyle blogs that generate income through advertising and foreground consumerist lifestyles. It argues that lifestyle blogs are dialogically constituted between the blogger, the readers, and the blog itself, and challenges the assumption of a unitary self by proposing that lifestyle blogs can best be understood in terms of the “dividual self.”

Julian Hopkins is Adjunct Senior Research Fellow at the School of Arts & Social Sciences, Monash University Malaysia. He has been researching the social and cultural implications of the internet and social media since the turn of the century, using a combination of ethnographic and sociological research methods.

Subject: General Anthropology Media Studies
Area: Asia



Contents

List of Illustrations
List of Tables
Acknowledgments
Chronology

Introduction: Anthroblogia: Participant Observation and Blogging in Malaysia
Chapter 1. The Blogs as Assemblage: Agency and Affordances
Chapter 2. January 2006: Blogwars, Hit Sluts, and Authenticity in the Personal Blogosphere
Chapter 3. The Blogger and Her Blog: (Dis)Assembling the Dividual Self
Chapter 4. May 2007: The Assembling of Genres
Chapter 5. Assembling Blogs and Bloggers
Chapter 6. April 2007: Voicy Consumers and Negotiating Networked Publics
Chapter 7. Assembling a Blog Market
Chapter 8. January 2009: Negotiating the Authentic Advertorial
Chapter 9. Assembling Lifestyles
Chapter 10. October 2009: Regional Blogmeet

Conclusions: The Dividual Self and Emergence of the Lifestyle Blog

References

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