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Visit Berghahn booth #315 at the American Historical Association 2017 Meeting

berghahn-2017-history

 

We are delighted to inform you that we will be attending the 2017 AHA Annual Meeting in Denver, January 5-8, 2017. Please stop by Booth #315 to browse our latest selection of books at discounted prices and pick up free journals’ samples.

 

If you are unable to attend, we would like to provide you with a special discount offer. For the next 30 days, receive a 25% discount on all History titles found on our website. At checkout, simply enter the discount code AHA17. Visit our website­ to browse our newly published interactive online History New & Recent Titles 2017 Catalog or use the new enhanced subject searching features for a complete listing of all published and forthcoming titles.

We hope to see you in Denver!


Below is a preview of some of our newest releases on display:

 

CROWN, CHURCH AND CONSTITUTION
Popular Conservatism in England, 1815-1867
Jörg Neuheiser
Translated from the German by Jennifer Walcoff Neuheiser

Volume 4, Studies in British and Imperial History

 

Much scholarship on nineteenth-century English workers has been devoted to the radical reform politics that powerfully unsettled the social order in the century’s first decades. Comparatively neglected have been the impetuous patriotism, royalism, and xenophobic anti-Catholicism that countless men and women demonstrated in the early Victorian period. This much-needed study of the era’s “conservatism from below” explores the role of religion in everyday culture and the Tories’ successful mobilization across class boundaries. Long before they were able to vote, large swathes of the lower classes embraced Britain’s monarchical, religious, and legal institutions in the defense of traditional English culture.

Read Introduction

 

BETWEEN BLOOD AND GOLD
The Debates over Compensation for Slavery in the Americas
Frédérique Beauvois

Volume 10, European Expansion & Global Interaction

 

Today, a century and a half after the abolition of slavery across most of the Americas, the idea of monetary reparations for former slaves and their descendants continues to be a controversial one. Lost among these debates, however, is the fact that such payments were widespread in the nineteenth century—except the “victims” were not slaves, but the slaveholders deprived of their labor. This landmark comparative study analyzes the debates over compensation within France and Great Britain. It lays out in unprecedented detail the philosophical, legal-political, and economic factors at play, establishing a powerful new model for understanding the aftermath of slavery in the Americas.

Read Introduction: Compensation as a Driving Force for Abolition

 

THE DEVIL’S WHEELS
Men and Motorcycling in the Weimar Republic
Sasha Disko

NEW SERIES: Volume 2, Explorations in Mobility

 

During the high days of modernization fever, among the many disorienting changes Germans experienced in the Weimar Republic was an unprecedented mingling of consumption and identity: increasingly, what one bought signaled who one was. Exemplary of this volatile dynamic was the era’s burgeoning motorcycle culture. With automobiles largely a luxury of the upper classes, motorcycles complexly symbolized masculinity and freedom, embodying a widespread desire to embrace progress as well as profound anxieties over the course of social transformation. Through its richly textured account of the motorcycle as both icon and commodity, The Devil’s Wheels teases out the intricacies of gender and class in the Weimar years.

Read Introduction: Does the man make the motorcycle or the motorcycle the man?

 

IN THE NAME OF THE GREAT WORK
Stalin’s Plan for the Transformation of Nature and its Impact in Eastern Europe
Edited by Doubravka Olšáková

Volume 10, Environment in History: International Perspectives

 

Beginning in 1948, the Soviet Union launched a series of wildly ambitious projects to implement Joseph Stalin’s vision of a total “transformation of nature.” Intended to increase agricultural yields dramatically, this utopian impulse quickly spread to the newly communist states of Eastern Europe, captivating political elites and war-fatigued publics alike. By the time of Stalin’s death, however, these attempts at “transformation”—which relied upon ideologically corrupted and pseudoscientific theories—had proven a spectacular failure. This richly detailed volume follows the history of such projects in three communist states—Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia—and explores their varied, but largely disastrous, consequences.

Read Introduction: The Stalin Plan for the Transformation of Nature and the East European Experience

 

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
Conservation and Globalization in the Twentieth Century
Edited by Wolfram Kaiser and Jan-Henrik Meyer

Volume 11, Environment in History: International Perspectives

 

Pollution, resource depletion, habitat management, and climate change are all issues that necessarily transcend national boundaries. Accordingly, they and other environmental concerns have been a particular focus for international organizations from before the First World War to the present day. This volume is the first to comprehensively explore the environmental activities of professional communities, NGOs, regional bodies, the United Nations, and other international organizations during the twentieth century. It follows their efforts to shape debates about environmental degradation, develop binding intergovernmental commitments, and—following the seminal 1972 Conference on the Human Environment—implement and enforce actual international policies.

Read Introduction: International Organizations and Environmental Protection in the Global Twentieth Century

 

OCCUPATION IN THE EAST
The Daily Lives of German Occupiers in Warsaw and Minsk, 1939-1944
Stephan Lehnstaedt
Translated by Martin Dean

 

Following their occupation by the Third Reich, Warsaw and Minsk became home to tens of thousands of Germans. In this exhaustive study, Stephan Lehnstaedt provides a nuanced, eye-opening portrait of the lives of these men and women, who constituted a surprisingly diverse population—including everyone from SS officers to civil servants, as well as ethnically German city residents—united in its self-conception as a “master race.” Even as they acclimated to the daily routines and tedium of life in the East, many Germans engaged in acts of shocking brutality against Poles, Belarusians, and Jews, while social conditions became increasingly conducive to systematic mass murder.

Read Introduction

 

Paperback Original

FRENCH FOREIGN POLICY SINCE 1945
An Introduction
Frédéric Bozo
Translated by Jonathan Hensher

 

When Charles de Gaulle declared that “it is because we are no longer a great power that we need a grand policy,” he neatly summarized France’s predicament on the world scene. In this compact and engaging history, author Frédéric Bozo deftly recounts France’s efforts to reconcile its proud history and global ambitions with a realistic appraisal of its capabilities, from the aftermath of World War II to the present. He provides insightful analysis of the nation’s triumphs and setbacks through the years of decolonization, Cold War maneuvering, and European unification, as well as the more contemporary challenges posed by an increasingly multipolar and interconnected world.

Read Introduction

 

WAR STORIES
The War Memoir in History and Literature
Edited by Philip Dwyer

 

Although war memoirs constitute a rich, varied literary form, they are often dismissed by historians as unreliable. This collection of essays is one of the first to explore the modern war memoir, revealing the genre’s surprising capacity for breadth and sophistication while remaining sensitive to the challenges it poses for scholars. Covering conflicts from the Napoleonic era to today, the studies gathered here consider how memoirs have been used to transmit particular views of war even as they have emerged within specific social and political contexts.

Read Chapter 1. Making Sense of the Muddle: War Memoirs and the Culture of Remembering

 

 

THE MAKING OF THE GREEK GENOCIDE
Contested Memories of the Ottoman Greek Catastrophe
Erik Sjöberg

Volume 23, War and Genocide

 

During and after World War I, over one million Ottoman Greeks were expelled from Turkey, a watershed moment in Greek history that resulted in hundreds of thousands of deaths. And while few dispute the expulsion’s tragic scope, it remains the subject of fierce controversy, as activists have fought for international recognition of an atrocity they consider comparable to the Armenian genocide. This book provides a much-needed analysis of the Greek genocide as cultural trauma. Neither taking the genocide narrative for granted nor dismissing it outright, Erik Sjöberg instead recounts how it emerged as a meaningful but contested collective memory with both nationalist and cosmopolitan dimensions.

Read Introduction: Cosmopolitan memory and the Greek genocide narrative

 

DIFFERENT GERMANS, MANY GERMANIES
New Transatlantic Perspectives
Edited by Konrad H. Jarausch, Harald Wenzel, and Karin Goihl

 

As much as any other nation, Germany has long been understood in terms of totalizing narratives. For Anglo-American observers in particular, the legacies of two world wars still powerfully define twentieth-century German history, whether through the lens of Nazi-era militarism and racial hatred or the nation’s emergence as a “model” postwar industrial democracy. This volume transcends such common categories, bringing together transatlantic studies that are unburdened by the ideological and methodological constraints of previous generations of scholarship. From American perceptions of the Kaiserreich to the challenges posed by a multicultural Europe, it argues for—and exemplifies—an approach to German Studies that is nuanced, self-reflective, and holistic.

Read Introduction

 

A FRAGMENTED LANDSCAPE
Abortion Governance and Protest Logics in Europe
Edited by Silvia De Zordo, Joanna Mishtal, and Lorena Anton

Volume 20, Protest, Culture & Society

 

Since World War II, abortion policies have remained remarkably varied across European nations, with struggles over abortion rights at the forefront of national politics. This volume analyses European abortion governance and explores how social movements, political groups, and individuals use protests and resistance to influence abortion policy. Drawing on case studies from Italy, Spain, Norway, Poland, Romania, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the European Union, it analyses the strategies and discourses of groups seeking to liberalise or restrict reproductive rights. It also illuminates the ways that reproductive rights politics intersect with demographic anxieties, as well as the rising nationalisms and xenophobia related to austerity policies, mass migration and the recent terrorist attacks in Europe.

Read Introduction


New In Paperback: 

 

MATTERS OF TESTIMONY
Interpreting the Scrolls of Auschwitz
Nicholas Chare and Dominic Williams

Check out Nicholas Chare and Dominic Williams’s piece on Slate’s The Vault and also Searching for Feelings: The Scrolls of Auschwitz and Son of Saul on the Berghahn Blog.

 

In Matters of Testimony, Nicholas Chare and Dominic Williams use the tools of literary criticism to analyse these formidable texts and offer new reflections on the scrolls. What sets the book apart is the way in which the authors consider how to read the Auschwitz scrolls, assessing their value as testimony… In that sense—and this is not the least significant element of this important book—they endeavour to reintegrate the Auschwitz scrolls into the general scholarship of Holocaust writing. This is incredibly interesting in the sense that the authors of the scrolls themselves asked the seminal questions that now structure this subfield of Holocaust studies… Matters of Testimony is an important work of scholarship.” · Jewish Quarterly

Read Introduction: Matters of Testimony

 

JEWISH MEDICAL RESISTANCE IN THE HOLOCAUST
Edited by Michael A. Grodin
Foreword by Joseph Polak
Afterword by Yulian Rafes

 

“[Grodin] compiled a fascinating series of articles documenting a little-known aspect of the Holocaust: medical resistance by Jewish physicians and health care workers… The articles cover a wide range of topics related to health care… [and] are fascinating to read. They inspire both compassion for those affected and awe of the courage of the health care professionals who risked their own lives to assist and save fellow Jews. Their sanctification of life, the core Jewish value, is duly honoured here. Libraries supporting programs in medical history, Holocaust studies, and bioethics will definitely want this book for their collections.” · Association of Jewish Libraries Reviews

Read Introduction

 

GERMANY AND THE BLACK DIASPORA
Points of Contact, 1250-1914
Edited by Mischa Honeck, Martin Klimke, and Anne Kuhlmann

Volume 15, Studies in German History

 

“In this exciting volume, Honeck, Klimke, and Kuhlmann put forward a unique resource for the burgeoning study of the African diaspora in Germany. Comprising essaysf rom scholars working in a variety of fields, the collection fills significant gaps in the current scholarship… In detailing a phenomenon long ignored within mainstream German culture and history, this collection will be of use to a variety of readers, including those working in African and African American studies, art history, German studies, and history…Highly recommended.” · Choice

 

SOUNDS OF MODERN HISTORY
Auditory Cultures in 19th- and 20th-Century Europe
Edited by Daniel Morat

 

“…this highly readable and well-sequenced text synthesises key research on the history of sound, bringing the work of the burgeoning field’s seminal figures into dialogue with that of emerging scholars of the history of European sound cultures.” · Melbourne Historical Journal

“As a whole, this collection provides a fine introduction to Sound Studies for historians of modern Europe and, at the same time, contributes new material to the growing body of work in this field. The collective work on World War I is perhaps the most original and compelling, but there is excellent scholarship throughout.” · German History

Read Introduction

 

U.S. FOREIGN POLICY AND THE OTHER
Edited by Michael Patrick Cullinane and David Ryan

 

“…the book is a valuable contribution to the field of U.S. foreign policy literature. Its greatest contribution will be in its elucidation of the symbiotic relationship between U.S. identity and the identification of U.S. adversaries, with the recognition that a nuanced understanding of its adversaries may facilitate the drafting of more successful foreign policies… The book should find a wide audience within the foreign policy analysis field and become a valuable addition to many libraries.” · International Social Science Review

Read Introduction

 

 


Forthcoming: 

 

CHILDREN IN THE HOLOCAUST AND ITS AFTERMATH
Historical and Psychological Studies of the Kestenberg Archive
Edited by Eva Fogelman, Sharon Kangisser Cohen, and Dalia Ofer

 

The testimonies of individuals who survived the Holocaust as children pose distinct emotional and intellectual challenges for researchers: as now-adult interviewees recall profound childhood experiences of suffering and persecution, they also invoke their own historical awareness and memories of their postwar lives, requiring readers to follow simultaneous, disparate narratives. This interdisciplinary volume brings together historians, psychologists, and other scholars to explore child survivors’ accounts. With a central focus on the Kestenberg Holocaust Child Survivor Archive’s over 1,500 testimonies, it not only enlarges our understanding of the Holocaust empirically but illuminates the methodological, theoretical, and institutional dimensions of this unique form of historical record.

 

GENOCIDE IN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE
Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks, 1913-1923
Edited by George N. Shirinian

 

The final years of the Ottoman Empire were catastrophic ones for its non-Turkish, non-Muslim minorities. From 1913 to 1923, its rulers deported, killed, or otherwise persecuted staggering numbers of citizens in an attempt to preserve “Turkey for the Turks,” setting a modern precedent for how a regime can commit genocide in pursuit of political ends while largely escaping accountability. While this brutal history is most widely known in the case of the Armenian genocide, few appreciate the extent to which the Empire’s Assyrian and Greek subjects suffered and died under similar policies. This definitive volume is the first to comprehensively examine the genocides of the Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks in comparative fashion, analyzing the similarities and differences among them and giving crucial context to present-day efforts for reparative justice.

 


BERGHAHN JOURNALS:

 

Aspasia
The International Yearbook of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European Women’s and Gender History

Aspasia is the international peer-reviewed annual of women’s and gender history of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe (CESEE). It aims to transform European women’s and gender history by expanding comparative research on women and gender to all parts of Europe, creating a European history of women and gender that encompasses more than the traditional Western European perspective.
Contributions to the History of Concepts

The journal serves as a platform for theoretical and methodological articles as well as empirical studies on the history of concepts and their social, political, and cultural contexts. It aims to promote the dialogue between the history of concepts and other disciplines, such as intellectual history, history of knowledge and science, linguistics, translation studies, history of political thought and discourse analysis.

 

Historical Reflections

Historical Reflections/Reflections Historiques has established a well-deserved reputation for publishing high quality articles of wide-ranging interest for nearly forty years. The journal, which publishes articles in both English and French, is committed to exploring history in an interdisciplinary framework and with a comparative focus. Historical approaches to art, literature, and the social sciences; the history of mentalities and intellectual movements; the terrain where religion and history meet: these are the subjects to which Historical Reflections/Reflexions Historiques is devoted.

 

Journal of Educational Media, Memory, and Society

JEMMS explores perceptions of society as constituted and conveyed in processes of learning and educational media. The focus is on various types of texts (such as textbooks, museums, memorials, films) and their institutional, political, social, economic, and cultural contexts. Special importance is given to the significance of educational media for social cohesion and conflict.

 

Mobility in History
The Yearbook of the International Association for the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility

Since 2003 the International Association for the History of Traffic, Transport and Mobility (T2M) has served as a free-trade zone, fostering a new interdisciplinary vitality in the now-flourishing study of the History of Mobility. In its Yearbook, Mobility in History, T2M surveys these developments in the form of a comprehensive state-of-the-art review of research in the field, presenting synopses of recent research, international reviews of research across many countries, thematic reviews, and retrospective assessments of classic works in the area. Mobility in History provides an essential and comprehensive overview of the current situation of Mobility studies.