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Happy Bastille Day

Celebrated on July, 14, Bastille Day is the French national day and one of the most important bank holidays in France. The day commemorates the beginning of the French Revolution with the storming of the Bastille on the 14th July 1789, a medieval fortress and prison which was a symbol of tyrannical Bourbon authority and […]

Celebrating Canada Day

  Canada Day is the national day of Canada, a holiday celebrating the anniversary of the July 1, 1867, enactment of the British North America Act which united separate colonies into a “kingdom in its own right” within the British Empire named the Dominion of Canada. As Canada celebrates its important national milestone, Berghahn is […]

Marcel Mauss: Between Sociology and Anthropology

Marcel Mauss, (born May 10, 1872—died Feb. 10, 1950), nephew of Émile Durkheim, French sociologist and anthropologist whose contributions include a highly original comparative study of the relation between forms of exchange and social structure. His views on the theory and method of ethnology are thought to have influenced many eminent social scientists. Learn more about […]

Durkheim, the ‘founding father’ of sociology

  “…Solidarity is, literally something which the society possesses.” – Émile Durkheim (April 15, 1858 – November 15, 1917)   David Émile Durkheim was a French sociologist, social psychologist and philosopher. Along with Karl Marx and Max Weber, he formally established the academic discipline and and is commonly cited as the principal architect of modern social science […]

How Eurocentrism & Coloniality Shaped Africa

What is Eurocentrism? What is an Athens-to-Washington discourse of world history? And how does the continent of Africa fit into this worldview? Empire, Global Coloniality and African Subjectivity came about as a way for us to find answers to these questions and light Africa’s situation within the ‘zone of non-being.’ Below, Dr. Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni explains […]

America, ‘Moby Dick,’ and the Other

“John Quincy Adams warned Americans not to search abroad for monsters to destroy, yet such figures have frequently habituated the discourses of U.S. foreign policy,” offers a succinct summation of newly published U.S. Foreign Policy and the Other. Following, editors Michael Patrick Cullinane and David Ryan use Herman Melville’s classic Moby Dick as a cautionary […]

Museum Studies Resources

  The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, often referred to as The Guggenheim, opened on October 21, 1959 at 1071 Fifth Avenue on the corner of East 89th Street in the Upper East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The building was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, though both Guggenheim and Wright would die before the […]

The Berlin Wall Is Built

On August 13, 1961, Berlin woke up to a shock: the East German Army had begun construction on the infamous Berlin Wall. The Wall was initially constructed in the middle of Berlin, and expanded over the following months. It entirely cut off West Berlin from the surrounding East Germany, prohibiting East Germans to pass into West […]

Celebrate National Parks and Recreation Month

  Each year since 1985, Americans have celebrated national Park and Recreation Month during the month of July to recognize the importance of parks and recreation in establishing and maintaining the quality of life for, and contributing to the physical, economic and environmental well-being of communities. To find out more please visit National Recreation and […]

Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2016

Unrivaled in scope and impact, the annual Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences is the convergence of approximately 70 scholarly associations, each holding their annual conference under one umbrella. Now in its 84th year, this flagship event is much more than Canada’s largest gathering of scholars. Congress brings together academics, researchers, policy-makers, and practitioners […]